Weekender: Nov. 6-7

Harvest Hootenanny

Saturday, Nov. 6

Louisville Nature Center

3745 Illinois Ave.

www.mightykindness.org

Free, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Ya’ll, it’s about to get mighty kind up in here — the free kind of kind. If you are looking for a way to connect with sustainable, earth-friendly services in our region, the folks at Mighty Kindness have made it easy, fun and “with great hope in our humanity and ingenuity.” The Harvest Hootenanny also annually gathers organizations, businesses, farmers, artisans, musicians and individuals who are creating a happier, healthier community in myriad inspiring ways. I’m talking free yoga all day, a community film fest, Mighty KIDness area and workshops on everything from square-foot gardening to alternative energy solutions. Support the artists’ bazaar featuring local art, jewelry, crafts and handmade goods (for all your holiday shopping needs), and local organic food and drinks. Bands include Kathleen Hoye, Alanna Fugate, Leigh Ann Yost, John Gage and many more. —Pam Swisher

•Blue Apple Players’ ‘Bullies’

Saturday, Nov. 6

Ursuline Arts Center

3114 Lexington Road

11 a.m.

Moving Collective’s ‘In the Air’

Saturday, Nov. 6

Ursuline Arts Center

3114 Lexington Road

$15; 8 p.m.

The Louisville-based dance company presents “In the Air,” the 10th installment of modern dance from the ensemble’s formation five years ago.

•Juilliard String Quartet

Sunday, Nov. 7

Comstock Hall, U of L

852-6507

$25 ($5 students); 2 p.m.

The Juilliard String Quartet, which first appeared in the Chamber Music Society of Louisville series in 1954 and has performed here many times since, is back again Sunday in Comstock Hall, at U of L. The Juilliard will perform a Schubert quartet that the young composer wrote for his family to play in 1815. The work was not publicly premiered until 1863, years after Schubert’s death. Also on the bill is a modern quartet by the late Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Donald Martino, and Beethoven’s “Quartet No. 15,” which is in five movements. The Beethoven quartet is said to be an inspiration for poet T.S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets.” —Bill Doolittle

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